Launching Today's Writer

Conference Updates

Amber Flora Thomas Interview Part-Two 3-2-15

2015 Pamlico Writers Conference and Competition

March 21, 2015 8:30am to 6pm

The Turnage Theatre

150 W. Main Street, Washington, NC 27889

Hello again. In today’s post we have part two of our interview with ECU, Professor of Poetry and Creative Writing, Amber Flora Thomas.

Ms. Thomas will present an afternoon workshop called, “Gathering Pearls: How to Put Together a Book of Poems.” Register early.

Now for our interview:

Amber Flora Thomas - 2015

Amber Flora Thomas
Professor of Poetry and Creative Writing, ECU

 

Q. Have you ever written anything that you absolutely hated? If so, what did you do with the piece?

   A. I have never written anything I hated, or if I hate it, it immediately goes in the trash. I’ve definitely written poems and essays that I’m embarrassed about because the writing was poorly executed or needed a lot more work. It took me eight years to finish my first book because I didn’t want to regret any of the poems later in life. We evolve and change, and so does our understanding of the past. I appreciate the mistakes in my earlier work because they show my evolution of mind and understanding.

Q. Who are your favorite classic and modern poets?

    A. Here are some of my go-to poets, meaning I go to their poems (the same ones) over and over again (no particular order): T. S. Eliot, Audre Lorde, Yusef Komuyakaa, Frank Bidart, Emily Dickinson, Theodore Roethke, Elizabeth Bishop, Marianne Moore, D. H. Lawrence, May Swenson, Pablo Neruda, Louise Gluck, Jorie Graham, Carl Phillips, Charles Wright, James Wright, Wislawa Szymborska, and Ann Carson.

Q. Which do you believe have had the greatest influence on you as a writer?

    A. I studied the early and mid-20th century poets in graduate school, so they have the greatest impact on my writing, probably because I have been thinking critically about their lives and writing the longest, so Dickinson, Moore, Bishop, Roethke, Eliot, Lawrence, and Neruda.

Q. What avenues do you use to market your work? (Social media, on-line sales, bookstores, etc.?) Which have you found to work best?

    A. I struggle to market my writing. I am not good a telling people about my accomplishments because it feels like bragging. Of course, this has impacted my success because I’ve noticed that succeeding as a writer is all about self-promotion these days. Most writers have dedicated websites, Facebook pages, blogs, and aren’t afraid to send out notices and reminders (lots and lots of them) about their events, publications, and awards. I am still working on developing a plan for promoting my writing in such a way that it is less distasteful to me. First, I need to set aside time to develop a website and blog. Then perhaps I’ll hire someone for a few hours each month to update these sites and post announcements. Is this the best approach? I still don’t know.

Q. If you were to write a poem of your life, what would the title be?

    A. Gosh, good question. Woman in the Fur Coat: An Autobiography of a Crazy Cat Lady. The Brown Girl’s Burning Truth: An Autobiography of a Writer and Her Secrets. This Time Tomorrow: One Woman’s Story of Unrest as Captured in Her Writing. These are terrible. Next question.

Q. What is one thing that most people don’t know about you? (Maybe a personal quirk, something like that).

    A. I lived in one house during my childhood, for about six months. Other than this brief period of time, I lived in trailers, tents, cars, and under the stars with my hippie parents and four siblings. In fact, we frequently did not have electricity and running water. Yup, I had a wild childhood. Book coming soon.

By Kaylene Wilson

For information on the writing competition or to register for either the pre-conference event on Friday night or the conference on Saturday, visit our website at: www.pamlicowritersconference.org
Follow us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/pwconference2015
and check us out on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/PamlicoWritersC

Amber Flora Thomas Interview Part-One 2-28-15

2015 Pamlico Writers Conference and Competition

March 21, 2015 8:30am to 6pm

The Turnage Theatre

150 W. Main Street, Washington, NC 27889

Hello, thanks for joining me again. Today we’re presenting part one of an interview with ECU, Professor of Poetry and Creative Writing, Amber Flora Thomas. Ms. Thomas has received numerous major poetry awards including: the Dylan Thomas American Poet Prize, Richard Peterson Prize and Ann Stanford Prize. Her published works include:  Eye of Water Poems (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2005) and The Rabbits Could Sing: Poems (University of Alaska Press, 2012). And her poetry has appeared in Zyzzyva, Callaloo, Orion Magazine, Alaska Quartlerly Review and Crab Orchard Review.

Ms. Thomas will be presenting an afternoon workshop called, “Gathering Pearls: How to Put Together a Book of Poems.” Come check it out.

Now to our interview:

Amber Flora Thomas - 2015

Amber Flora Thomas
Professor of Poetry and Creative Writing, ECU

Q.  As a professor of Creative Writing at East Carolina University, have you noticed a majority of your students gravitating toward poetry or prose?

    A. It changes all the time. In general, many students gravitate toward genre fiction, especially fantasy and science fiction because much of what they read is engaged with fantasy and futuristic worlds. Many students are aware of my writing, so they are interested in working with me because they want to write poetry.

Q. Is there a particular place your ideas for your writing come from? (What’s happening around you, your life, your causes, a message you want to convey or just imagination?)

    A. I’m very suspicious of “ideas” when I approach a writing project. Primarily, my writing emerges from imagery and sound. I’m drawn to the natural world so the rhythms of nature are usually triggers for my writing. Ideas come into play when I am compiling poems in a manuscript because I need to provide a thematic presentation of the work. The individual poems are always a surprise. Sometimes I don’t even know what I am writing until I’ve written the final line.

Q. What does your writing process look like? (Regular, sporadic, a quiet room, listening to music, maybe an animal lying at your feet or what?)

    A. I write almost every day. I generally write new work before I go to sleep at night and I revise and edit in the morning. Some evenings I’m too tired and I fall asleep in the middle of writing my first line. Recently, I have been writing in spurts. I’ll write five new poems one week and then spend the next two weeks reworking them and fitting them into my manuscript. It also depends on where I am with a larger project. For example, I am finishing my third manuscript of poetry at the moment, so I am writing (and revising) a lot. I carry a journal with me everywhere I go—something small and pocket-size because I seem to get inspired at the most inconvenient times, like when I’m walking to the car after a long day at work.

Q. How do you use stanzas and line breaks in your poetry?

    A. It depends on the poem. I love a long line and a short stanza. If I’m picking up a book of poems and the writer uses long lines and couplets, for example, I am more likely to start reading because this structure suggests greater experimentation. I also like more erratic line use. As long as there is awareness about the relationship between the line and sentence, I am happy.

Q. What is the toughest criticism you’ve ever received? What’s the best?

    A. I always thought the best criticism I could receive was silence. When I finished reading my poem and a workshop of my peers had nothing to say, I was happy. I felt as though I had written such a powerful poem that no one could say anything critical. This is a lonely place, which is perhaps fitting for poetry; however, now that I am a teacher, I realize that silence has many meanings, few of which are complementary. When I was deep in the editing process with my first book, Eye of Water: Poems, I asked my editor, Ed Ochester (University of Pittsburgh Press) how the book would be received. He very quietly told me that the work was “difficult” and would not have as wide an audience for this very reason. This was tough to hear. After years, I have decided that I am “difficult” and there is nothing wrong with being difficult. I read difficult poets. Life is complex and poetry is a place where complexity is welcome and beautiful. Of course, it took me ten years to feel okay about his brief critique.

Q. As a writer, is there a legacy you’d like to leave behind?

    A. Books, lots and lots of published books.

By Kaylene Wilson

For information on the writing competition or to register for either the pre-conference event on Friday night or the conference on Saturday, visit our website at: www.pamlicowritersconference.org
Follow us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/pwconference2015
and check us out on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/PamlicoWritersC

Alex Albright Interview – Part-Two 2-24-15

2015 Pamlico Writers Conference and Competition

March 21, 2015 8:30am to 6pm

The Turnage Theatre

150 W. Main Street, Washington, NC 27889

Hello again. We hope you’ve had a chance to read part-one of our interview with ECU- Creative Writing-Nonfiction Professor, Alex Albright this past Sunday. Today we’re presenting part two of that interview. And remember, Professor Albright will be presenting an afternoon workshop, “More than the Facts: How Creative Nonfiction Transforms What Happened,” at 2:00pm, this session should help you understand how to effectively incorporate this type of writing into your own works.

Now, let’s begin part two of our interview with Professor Alex Albright:
Alex Albright photo  2015

 

 

 

Alex Albright, Creative Writing, Nonfiction professor ECU
(photo by Tom Whelan)
www.rafountain.com
Q. What do you say to writers without a traditional background/training in the art of writing?

     A. Editors generally don’t care about your background or training. What they want is a compelling story told well. This isn’t to say you can get away with grammatical illiteracy–that’s a different kind of training, and essential. But people who read a lot are training themselves for their craft, just as those who read their own work aloud before turning it loose are honing their craft even as they breathe and then speak the words they’ve written. There’s certainly no need for an MFA or any kind of advanced college degree to get published–which isn’t to say at all that the time to write (and the writing community) afforded by such course work isn’t invaluable.

Q. Do you ever experience writer’s block, and (if so) how do you conquer it?

     A. When the writing stalls, as invariably it must, I try to get back to research, sometimes on a different subject. Or else wash dishes or clean my study.

Q. If you were to begin your writing career over, would you do it differently? If so, how?

     A. I still have my student ID from the University of Iowa, where I intended to go for an MFA in 1973. So I have over the years thought often of how things might have been different had I gotten there. But invariably, I wind up back to the same solid core belief: the journey that got me here, today, has been the best one for me to travel.

Q. Is there a current work in progress or a recent work you would like to comment on?

     A. I spent years working on my Navy band history book, but almost as soon as it was published I started to realize that very little was known about the over 100 black Navy bands that had served in World War II. As a result, I’ve started a series of webpages dedicated to these bands [www.rafountain.com/navy] in an attempt to document them all, individually, which seems a mammoth enough task that it can never be finished.

By Doris Schneider

For more information or to register for either the pre-conference event on Friday night or the conference on Saturday, visit our website at: www.pamlicowritersconference.org
Follow us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/pwconference2015
and check us out on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/PamlicoWritersC

Alex Albright Interview – Part-One 2-22-15

 2015 Pamlico Writers Conference and Competition

March 21, 2015 8:30am to 6pm

The Turnage Theatre

150 W. Main Street, Washington, NC 27889

Hello and thanks again for stopping by. Today we’re pleased to present our first of a two-part interview with another of our conference presenters, Professor, Alex Albright, ECU – Creative Writing-Nonfiction. The afternoon workshop Professor Albright will be presenting is called, “More Than the Facts: How Creative Nonfiction Transforms What Happened.” With so many articles on the internet about Creative Nonfiction, this session I believe will prove more helpful. First because you’ll have someone knowledgeable in the field presenting it to you. Second he’ll also be able to answer your questions on how you can use this style in your own writing. This one of a kind workshop and should prove very beneficial to all who attend. Now let me share with you a little about Alex Albright.

Alex Albright photo  2015

 

 

 

Alex Albright, Creative Writing, Nonfiction professor ECU
(photo by Tom Whelan)

He wrote, “The Forgotten First: B-1 and the Integration of the Modern Navy”, published by R.A. Fountain (October 2013), and is the story of a NC-based Navy band comprised of the first African Americans to serve at rank higher than messman. He and his wife also operate R. A. Fountain, bookseller, publisher and part-time music venue and internet cafe. www.rafountain.com In 2012 they won the NC Folklore Society’s Brown-Hudson Award for special contributions to “the appreciation, continuation, or study of North Carolina folk traditions.”

AWARDS AND EDITORSHIPS
The Bertie Fearing Excellence in Teaching Award
R. Hunt Parker Award, NC Lit and History Society
Founding Editor, North Carolina Literary Review

Now on to our interview with Professor Alex Albright:

Q.  As a writer of history and creative nonfiction, is the research or the writing more rewarding?

A.  Not much is more rewarding than seeing the two come together. Research, for me, is often the more compelling task, especially so long as it continues to lead me in new and unexpected directions. And those new directions make it, sometimes, too easy to postpone the writing a little longer. It seems rare that I get far in the writing part without continuing to discover more research that needs to be done. But once I’m satisfied that the research is exhausted, I find a new kind of pleasure in manipulating structure and finding the best way to begin–which often doesn’t happen until near the end.

Q.  In writing historical nonfiction, how do you separate the creative from the historic?

A.  If what you’re writing is a novel, your responsibility to “fact” is less rigid: don’t intrude historical inaccuracies that will hinder your credibility. But if what you’re writing is creative nonfiction, it’s good to remember that the “c” part of the genre is really more about how you present your story than about how you enliven it imaginatively. CNF, for me, is still as historically accurate as possible, although there is always room for a strong speculative voice that can have the power of revising how historical facts might be seen.

Q.  Of your different writing genres, which is the one that feeds you emotionally and keeps you writing?

A.  Although my career has been built around editing and the writing of nonfiction and creative nonfiction, I still keep coming back to a poly sci-fi novel I’ve been working on for 25 years. And I’ve also still got too many boxes of research files that need attending. Just thinking about those files makes me want to get back into them, when I’m finally caught up with everything else. So the emotional motivation that keeps me writing is the realization that my time to get these things done is slipping away with every distraction I allow into my life.

Q.  What is the greatest stimulus to your writing (social need, student need, a personal muse, sense memory, etc)?

A.  Most of my work is driven by a curiosity to know how & why something happened. I’ve always been attracted to marginalized people and settings, and in those I find plenty of room for exploration. The mainstream seems to have a surplus of chroniclers; what we need, I think, are more people paying closer attention to the stories that, without close and immediate attention, will be forever lost. Eastern North Carolina is full of these stories; yet, many of the students whose work I read want to be elsewhere, writing about “there” instead of what they already know.

By Doris Schneider and Kaylene Wilson

For writing competition submission guidelines or information on conference registration and a complete list of planned events and workshops visit our website at: www.pamlicowritersconference.org
And follow us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/pwconference2015
or check us out on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/PamlicoWritersC

Don’t forget, the deadline to enter the writing competition is March 8, 2015.

Register early. Register soon.

Katharine Ashe – Interview Part One 2-16-15

 

2015 Pamlico Writers Conference and Competition

March 21, 2015 8:30am to 6pm

The Turnage Theatre

150 W. Main Street, Washington, NC 27889

Katharine Ashe - full headshot      2015

 

 

 

 

Katharine Ashe  www.KatharineAshe.com

Today post will be an interview with talented author Katharine Ashe. Ms. Ashe will be presenting an afternoon breakaway session, “Writing Inside a Genre Yet Outside the Box.” This workshop is intended for writers at all stages of the writing adventure and will be filled with information and fun for those who attend.

KatKatharine Ashe - I Loved a Rogueharine Ashe is the award-winning author of historical romances that    reviewers call “intensely lush” and “sensationally intelligent,” including How to Be a Proper Lady, an Amazon Editors’ Choice for the 10 Best Books of the Year in Romance, and How to Marry a Highlander, 2014 finalist for the prestigious RITA® Award of the Romance Writers of America. Her books are recommended by Publishers Weekly, Women’s World Magazine, Booklist, Library Journal, Barnes & Noble, the Raleigh News & Observer, and many others, and translated into languages across the world.

KathaKatharine Ashe - I Married the Dukerine lives in the wonderfully warm Southeast with her beloved husband, son, dog, and a garden she likes to call romantic rather than unkempt. A professor of European History at Duke University, she writes fiction because she thinks modern readers deserve grand adventures and breathtaking sensuality too. For more about Katharine’s books, please visit www.KatharineAshe.com or write to her at PO Box 51702, Durham, NC 27717.

Katharine Ashe - I Adored a Lord

 

 

 

Q.    Your fans know that you are a Professor of History at Duke University. Does this influence your novels or does your writing influence your teaching?

A.    My love of scholarly history strongly influences the fiction I write. I’m not an antiquarian; I don’t love history for history’s sake, I don’t want to live “back then”, and I’m not enamored of the minutiae of historical daily life (though I certainly find it interesting). I study and teach history because I believe that in understanding what people have done in the past, what they have valued, and the mistakes they’ve made as well as the victories they have achieved, we can learn to become more humane, just and compassionate individuals and societies today. I write genre romance, which means that my stories are about a single hero and heroine’s love story, emphasizing the development of the love relationship, the conflicts that divide the hero and heroine, and the solutions that they come to individually and together and lead to their shared Happily Ever After. But I typically draw these stories upon a broader canvas of societal conflict. The lovers I write struggle with personal demons and misunderstandings, but they also confront societal challenges like racism, hunger, poverty, sexism, violence and other injustices. I write romance because I adore writing love stories, but they’re always embedded in larger themes.

Q.    I love the fact that your heroines are strong women. Are they based on women in your life?

A.    Thank you! My heroines possess the qualities I most admire in women I know—intelligence, creativity, independence, loyalty, honesty, an adventuresome spirit, and a loving heart—as well as strengths in women I admire from a distance. At least one of my heroines drew her most endearing qualities from my mother, and I’ve named a few of my heroines after my sisters.

Q.   You say that your younger sister was your first fan. Was she the one who encouraged you to follow your writing dream?

A.   Yes, as well as my parents and my older sisters and brother, and some friends as well—from the time I was a little girl. My husband and son are entirely supportive too. As most writers know, writing isn’t a particularly easy career. Writing genre romance is especially dicey for a writer who’s social and professional milieu doesn’t respect the genre, and sometimes loudly condemns it. I’ve been blessed with the support of my loved ones all through my writing journey. I can’t imagine how writers that don’t have support manage to keep their chins up and fingers typing, and I raise a glass in admiration of them.

Q.   Romance often is treated with a lack of respect; have you ever felt the need or desire to defend your choice of writing genre?

A.   For years I didn’t tell anyone other than my family and closest friends that I wrote romance. Now I’m entirely open about my career as a romance author. But I’m not so much interested in defending romance fiction, rather in teaching and discussing the history of the denigration of romance fiction, especially fiction written by women, for female authors and romance novels written by women have historically borne the lion’s share of condemnation from critics of the genre, even when their male counterparts wrote similar novels. This fascinates and disturbs me, especially since it’s still happening today. I’m currently co-teaching a course on this at Duke University, with romance author and Professor Laura Florand. This spring we’re also hosting a speaker’s series titled “UNSUITABLE” (http://sites.duke.edu/unsuitable/) in which we address the history of the industry, models of femininity and masculinity in romance fiction, and other topics that get at the roots of the prejudice against the genre.

Q.   Even if I do not write Historical Romance, what might I learn from your session that would help me be a better writer?

A.   I adore a deeply researched novel of any sort—historical novel, crime thriller, military adventure, cozy mystery, epic fantasy, or what have you. The more intricate and interesting the details of that novel’s world, the deeper I sink into the story. But it drives me crazy when I read a novel and can practically see the author sitting at a table in a library surrounded by massive tomes and cramming “research”, or consuming entire research websites, only to regurgitate it onto the page for the reader to swallow whole. Rich complexity in a novel is crucial to me, but too much dry detail on the page snatches me right out of a story. In my session I’ll talk about how I develop and write a fast-paced, character-based story that is thoroughly grounded in research but doesn’t ever get lost in it.

By Sherri Hollister

 For more information on or about the
2015 Pamlico Writers Conference or Competition
visit our website at:
www.pamlicowritersconference.org
And follow us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/pwconference2015
or check us out on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/PamlicoWritersC

21 days (March 8, 2015) left before our writing competition entry deadline. If you’re still working on your entry(s) you’ll need to hurry. For details and rules for the writing competition entries as well as a complete list of planned events and workshops for the conference, visit our website at www.pamlicowritersconference.org . Hurry and get those pieces ready and entered soon so they’ll be elligible.

If you haven’t already registered for the conference you’ll need to do so soon so you can reserve a seat in whichever workshops you’re planning to attend before they are filled.

Register early. Register soon.

Dave Wofford – Interview 2-13-15

2015 Pamlico Writers Conference and Competition

March 21, 2015 8:30am to 6pm

The Turnage Theatre

150 W. Main Street, Washington, NC 27889

Horse & Buggy Press Todays interview is with printer/publisher Dave Wofford of Horse and Buggy Press. During the conference, Mr. Wofford will begin the day as one of a three person panel discussion on Launching Today’s Writer. He will discuss cover and interior page designs and all that it entails. Later, in a breakaway session, Mr. Wofford will present a workshop on Book Design for the Self-publisher. His talk will center on design philosophies along with sharing content from recent H&B titles and stories from collaborations. Side spurs and tangents will also be explored and audience participation is encouraged. He will have a selection of books for his audience to see and handle. This workshop should prove interesting and helpful for all who attend.

Dave Wofford - Horse and Buggy Press 

 

 

 

Dave Wofford

http://www.horseandbuggypress.com/

https://horseandbuggypress.wordpress.com/

As a book designer who has run Horse & Buggy Press as a one person design and letterpress company since 1996, I enjoy working on a wide range of books for small and large publishers (art books, novels, history, poetry, memoirs), and directly for writers who are self-publishing, either because they want a more collaborative experience seeing their work brought to the final form of a physical book, or because they don’t want to deal with shopping a book around to publishers and waiting on all that entails.

Q.   When a new writer comes to you with a manuscript, what do you do with the book that will save the writer time and frustration?

A.   When I first sit with a writer who is hiring me to design and produce their book, I ask them to share with me the background of the writing of the story, where did it arise from; and also where do they plan to place it so the reading public will discover it, and who do they see as the main intended target audience for the book? I try to find out as much as possible about how the writer sees the story and the hopes of its presentation before I read the manuscript myself and conversation covers not only design but what are marketing plans/goals.

I explain some of the parameters about book production options (edition size, page size, paper types) so the writer understands some of the big picture parameters before we start talking about design possibilities. I believe it almost always makes sense to figure out and explain the production route the book will go through (digital vs offset, soft vs hard cover, standard page size versus something a little out of the ordinary) before starting to focus on design, typography and style issues.

The big thing of course that a good book designer does is make reading the book more enjoyable by creating a beautiful visual artifact, and preferably in an engaging style that is harmonious with the content or type of writing within the book. Personally, I always design a book from the inside out. The cover is the last thing I work on for many reasons including I might get cover design ideas while working on the “meat” of the book.

Q.   Can the writer provide art for the cover or is that discouraged?

A.  I enjoy it when authors understand how to brainstorm, that is they bring ideas to the table (and occasionally even a piece of art to be considered for the cover or frontispiece) but they are open to hearing totally different ideas and responding with specifics about what they like or don’t like in seeing what I come up with, and they don’t look at me like a tool to just execute any idea in their head or that they have seen done elsewhere. On a good project, there will be enjoyable conversation.

Q.  How finished should the manuscript be when the writer brings it to you? (In other words, should it be edited, proofread, and no more changes required unless they happen in the formatting?)

A.  It is best if I don’t start designing a book until the manuscript is done, edited, and proofread (it definitely makes things more efficient which also helps keep costs down) but it is of course not that big of a deal to fix a few typos here and there after design has begun. Occasionally for larger book projects, and especially ones that have a number of illustrations, captions, sidebars and accompanying info I might design a chapter and stop, sharing it with the author to make sure they like the visual strategy before running it through the entire book.

Q.  What do you do that will make the book more marketable?

A.  When I finish designing a book, my job is not over as I am also the production coordinator and I ensure that the book manufacturing goes well, problems are avoided, schedules are maintained, and there are no unpleasant surprises seeing the design turned into a physical artifact. I explain how different size editions may or may not be that much of a difference in cost. The books I designed have quite a bit more attention to detail in typography and compositional page design than the majority of the books out there, and of course this helps books get picked up more often in the book store or at the book fair/conference, etc. Working with a computer is something anyone can do of course, but a book designer brings a heavy background of typography, composition, and visual aesthetics that are based on years of visual training and practice.

Horse & Buggy Press, Printing crowsAs the world gets filled up with more and more fast paced gadgets and backlit screens everywhere we look, a well-designed book that deals with things like subtlety and quiet beauty are more and more appreciated and stand out because of the grace they have, a sense of aesthetics that rewards our sense of touch, and because they leave room for the reader to absorb content and activate their imagination.

In addition to working as book designer for publishers and writers I also publish fine press books under the H&B imprint. These are very much based on making the book a special artifact, and being more concerned with aesthetics than economics sometimes, which is a nice treat and a bit different from my work on trade book editions.

Here are links to a few of these fine press projects. Most of these editions go out of print within a year of producing them but I’ll be bringing copies to the conference for showing and sharing.

https://horseandbuggypress.wordpress.com/2012/06/04/maji-moto-fine-press-book-and-foyer-gallery-exhibit/
https://horseandbuggypress.wordpress.com/2013/11/27/testify-a-visual-love-letter-to-appalachia/
https://horseandbuggypress.wordpress.com/2013/11/27/roses-the-late-french-poetry-of-rainer-maria-rilke-in-progress/

Another project that I really enjoy working on are memoir projects and I enjoy showing how it is possible to combine the inexpensive digital printing with hand-printed letterpress covers, showing you can incorporate very different technologies in the same book and make memoir books in small editions that are amazingly affordable for being so much nicer in quality than the average machine printed memoir book you see. I enjoy bringing these stories and histories to light, and making book editions that are so nice, I know they will be passed down for multiple generations and really provide a strong link between several generations, something that seems to get lost in today’s world.

By Doris Schneider

For more information about the writing competition or conference registration

visit our website at:
www.pamlicowritersconference.org
And follow us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/pwconference2015
or check us out on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/PamlicoWritersC

Susan Sloate – Part Two 2-10-15

2015 Pamlico Writers Conference and Competition

March 21, 2015 8:30am to 6pm

The Turnage Theatre

150 W. Main Street, Washington, NC 27889

Some of you might remember our Part One of a two-part interview with author Susan Sloate on January 29th. Today we present Part Two of that interview.

Susan Sloate

 

 

 

 

 

Susan Sloate
www.susansloate.com

Q.    Do you ever experience writer’s block? If so, how do you conquer it?

A.    I used to have writer’s block regularly, when it was really more a fear of not knowing how to do it than anything else. I’d be confronted with a writing problem and instead of thinking about it and trying to figure it out, I’d wilt. And then I’d end up procrastinating and hating myself for procrastinating–a truly vicious cycle almost all writers have gone through. As I’ve gotten older and become more at ease with myself, I still have moments of experiencing writer’s block, but now it’s more of a not-wanting-to-get-down-to-it, and fortunately, Nanowrimo is a great cure for that. I recommend it to every writer I know; NOTHING can motivate you to blast through writer’s block than a month of writing lousy but getting the words down on the page. And when you DO finally get it down, turns out it’s never as lousy as you think.

To me the cure for writer’s block is to write. No matter how awful you think it is, just sit down and start. You’d be surprised at what might come of it. And at the least, you’re not sitting around hating yourself for NOT writing.

Q.    You seem to be an explorer. Is there something new on the horizon that you want to tackle?

A.    I have ideas about getting involved again in the movie business; they’re beginning the same kind of revolution in movie distribution as we have going on in publishing now, and it’s a fabulous time to be there. I want to do more in marketing myself and other writers. I have some wild dreams I’d like to make come true, that I won’t share in print right now. I want to do a lot more public speaking, especially to writers; I enjoy being able to show others the possibilities–they’re so enormous and a lot of writers have no idea what options they have. It’s so rewarding to lay those options in front of them. And I’m sure other opportunities will come up that thrill me but that just haven’t occurred to me yet. But I’ll keep opening doors to see what’s there. You just never know.

Q.    As a writer, is there anything you would do differently if you could begin your career again?

A.    I wouldn’t waste my time, and I wouldn’t be so dumb! When I think of some of the decisions I made years ago, thinking they’d lead somewhere good, it appalls me. I advise every writer who asks me not to even consider traditional publishing right now. There are too many exciting options in self-publishing, and too much opportunity. Don’t close yourself off from that. Of course, the biggest thing I’d do differently is: I’d write a lot more. But I can’t get those years back. I can only use the time I have now and hope it’ll be enough to finish all the projects I still want to do.

 Ms. Sloate will present two workshops at our conference (one morning session and one afternoon session): Marketing Your Work through Amazon and Movies to Books: Using screenwriters’ secrets to structure your novel. Both of sessions will be packed with information and should prove helpful for everyone in attendance.

By Kaylene Wilson and Doris Schneider

For more information on or about the

2015 Pamlico Writers Conference or Competition
visit our website at:
www.pamlicowritersconference.org
And follow us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/pwconference2015
or check us out on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/PamlicoWritersC

If you’re still planning to enter the writing competition, the deadline is getting close (March 8, 2015 entry deadline). For details on the competition entry rules,visit our website. Be sure to get your written pieces entered early. Letting an opportunity like this slip through your hands, would be a shame.

And if you haven’t, go ahead and register for the conference and chose which workshops you’d like to attend before they are filled. Visit our website (www.pamlicowritersconference.org) for a complete list of planned events and workshops. Register early. Register soon.

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